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Work-Life Balance: The Real Effects of Nutrition and Health

Results of a recent study showed that "Those who save for the future by contributing to a 401(k) improved abnormal health test results and poor health behaviors approximately 27 percent more than non-contributors." This month's "By the Numbers" data from work-life balance expert Jeff Davidson demonstrates that our society could use a little help in the area of improving nutrition.

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Results of a recent study showed that “Those who save for the future by contributing to a 401(k) improved abnormal health test results and poor health behaviors approximately 27 percent more than non-contributors.” This month's “By the Numbers” data from work-life balance expert Jeff Davidson demonstrates that our society could use a little help in the area of improving nutrition.

We're not suggesting you call all your clients and try to sign them up for the latest fad diets, but in your role as a trusted advisor, your clients do listen to what you have to say, so while you're engaging them in conversation about their financial health, it might be enlightening to start a discussion about nutritional health as well.

78 million American adults are obese. 13 million children are obese. (Fitness.gov)

156 Pounds = The amount of added sugars Americans consume each year. In 1900, the amount was 2 pounds. (WebMD)

The typical teen consumes TWICE as much soda as milk. (CDC.gov)

$150 billion = The annual cost of obesity-related medical conditions in the U.S. (Fitness.gov)

40% of the daily calorie intake of U.S. children aged 2-18 is made up of added sugars and solid fats. (CDC.gov)

Obesity Rates by Ethnicity: (KFF.org)

  • Asian: 40%
  • White: 62%
  • Hispanic: 69%
  • Black: 72%

45% of children living in poverty are obese. (Fitness.gov)

9 in 10 Americans consumer more than the daily recommended amount of sodium. (CDC.gov)

25% of Americans eat some type of fast food each day. (CBS)

Since the 1970s, the rate of obesity in U.S. children has doubled. (Fast Food Nation)

More than 6 in 10 college students don't get the recommended five servings of vegetables and fruits per day. (USA Today)